Nearly a third of workers think their company is ‘stuck in the past’ with technology

Top signs of outdated technology or practices include using Post-It notes as reminders, printing everything out – and not having Wi-Fi

Post-It note reminders are one of the top signs of an outdated business

Nearly a third of workers think their company is “stuck in the past” when it comes to technology, with some using outdated operating systems – or even getting by without Wi-Fi.

A poll of 2,000 adults in employment found many businesses have been slow to embrace new tech, and still depend on manual filing systems, business cards and landline phones.

A culture of printing everything out is commonplace in 15% of businesses, as is using Post-Its for reminders (17%), and having bulky CRT monitors rather than flat screens (4%).

But rather than being a minor inconvenience, 71% of those who think their employer is stuck in the past admitted it has made them consider their future at the company.

However, nearly a third (32%) tend to struggle to get to grips with new technology when it’s introduced.







Many businesses still rely on manual filing systems
(

Image:

Michael Macor/The San Francisco Chronicle/Getty Images)

Gregg Pearce, director of SOHO (Small Office/Home Office) at Virgin Media O2, which commissioned the survey to mark the launch of hyperfast gigabit-speed fibre broadband for small businesses, said: “Whether it’s legacy laptops or slow dial-up, our research shows how too many UK businesses are being held back by outdated tech.

“Being behind the times with tech doesn’t just impact the way businesses serve their customers – old-fashioned work practices are also impacting staff morale, and making people think twice about their future at a company.

“It’s time to bring UK businesses up to speed.”

The study also found 10% of workers still submit their holiday requests on paper, while 13% claim their work computer is creakingly slow.

Other archaic business practices include old-school computer mice with balls (11%), while 4% even said they’re still on dial-up internet.

But nearly one in four (23%) claimed their workplace has tried to embrace modern technology – only to go back to the old ways.

Of those, 45% decided their business is still too small to warrant the investment, and 28% felt they weren’t business-critical, according to the OnePoll figures.

However, 71% believe their workplace would be held back if they had a slow and unreliable internet connection.

And 82% said quick, reliable internet is the single most important tool available to their businesses.

Gregg Pearce added: “A fast, reliable, flexible internet connection has become a must-have for small businesses, especially after the past two years.

“Whether it’s a side hustle on social media, video calls from the office, sole traders selling online, or guest Wi-Fi on the high street – broadband opens doors to better business.”

TOP 30 OLD-FASHIONED BUSINESS PRACTICES:

  1. Has a hole punch
  2. Instant coffee instead of a coffee machine
  3. Uses Post-It note reminders
  4. Prints everything out
  5. Keeps physical records for all paperwork
  6. Has a manual filing system
  7. Old and slow laptops/desktop computers
  8. Still uses business cards
  9. Uses a holiday wall chart
  10. Staples receipts together
  11. Uses a mouse with a ball in it
  12. Holiday requests have to be submitted on paper
  13. Doesn’t use social media effectively
  14. Still uses stamps instead of a franking machine
  15. Landline phones only
  16. No dedicated videoconferencing facilities
  17. Uses a dated operating system
  18. Printers are decrepit and don’t work properly
  19. Expense reports have to be submitted on paper
  20. Uses corrective fluid e.g. Tipp-Ex
  21. Localised intranet is old – slow, dated, doesn’t work very well
  22. Has a slow or dated website
  23. Lack of Wi-Fi
  24. Uses memos
  25. Uses fax machines
  26. Has not embraced smartphones
  27. Doesn’t have a website
  28. Uses CRT monitors rather than flat screen monitors
  29. Work needs a binding machine to be put together
  30. Uses dial-up internet

Read More

Read More