Fixed – Gulf War Syndrome Mystery: US Government Funded Scientists Blame SARIN Released Into the Air

The bombing of Saddam Hussein Chemical weapon the arsenal could be the cause of tens of thousands of British and US soldiers affected by the mysterious Gulf War syndrome, scientists say.

Puzzled researchers have spent decades searching for the root cause of the disease, which has left veterans battling fatigue, memory problems and chronic pain.

Now, a US government-funded study claims to offer the “most definitive” proof of the destruction of IraqThe storage of chemical weapons is responsible.

The explosions of January 1991, centered on the cities of Muthanna and Fallujah, released sarin, a lethal nerve agent, into the air.

Artificial gas – used in the terrorist attack on the Tokyo subway – usually kills, but the doses inhaled by the Western military have been diluted.

Dr. Robert Haley, who has been studying the syndrome for nearly three decades, said the quantities were still enough to make people sick, however.

He said: “There are still more than 100,000 Gulf War veterans who are not receiving help for this disease.

“Our hope is that these results will accelerate the search for a better treatment.”

Sarin gas released when troops destroyed Iraqi chemical weapons depots during the Gulf War is the likely cause of the so-called

Sarin gas released when troops destroyed Iraqi chemical weapons depots during the Gulf War is the probable cause of the so-called “Gulf War Syndrome” affecting a quarter of a million veterans

The map shows the location of the main chemical weapons depots bombed on the night of January 18-19, 1991 and the location of US military units and detection sites for sarin and other chemical weapons from January 19-21.

SARIN: ONE OF THE MOST DEADLY CHEMICAL AGENTS

Sarin is colorless, tasteless and odorless.

It is one of the most toxic CW agents known, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Once a person has breathed in sarin, death can occur within 1-10 minutes if there is no treatment.

If drunk, the victim can survive for up to 18 hours

A fraction of an ounce of the nerve agent on the skin can be fatal.

Exposure to the gas causes the pupils to shrink to a precise size and foam on the lips.

Symptoms include paralysis, loss of consciousness, and respiratory failure.

Treatment should be given immediately and antidotes include atropine and pralidoxime chloride.

Syria is believed to have one of the world’s largest arsenals of chemical weapons, including sarin and mustard gas.

Approximately 33,000 soldiers in the UK and 250,000 in the US have complained of a range of chronic and unexplained symptoms, which also include fever, night sweats, and problems with memory and concentration.

Hundreds of thousands of US soldiers, along with soldiers from a coalition of 35 entered countries, were sent to Kuwait in August 1990 following the country’s annexation to Iraq.

Western nations feared that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein would march his troops further south and take control of Saudi Arabia and its oil supplies.

Allied nations began air strikes in January 1991 after Iraq missed the UN deadline to withdraw from Kuwait.

But Iraqi troops eventually withdrew a month later following airstrikes on military and other targets in Iraq and Kuwait.

Soldiers reported suffering from the series of symptoms upon returning from the conflict, and in the years following the war, cases had been recorded in the UK, Denmark, Canada and Australia.

The original theories on the cause of the disease centered on debris from depleted uranium ammunition, but evidence has since accumulated to suggest that sarin is to blame.

Dr. Haley and colleagues examined 1,016 American soldiers who served during the conflict.

Half of the participants had symptoms of Gulf War syndrome, which may also include difficulty finding words, diarrhea, and sexual dysfunction. The others don’t.

Blood and DNA samples were taken and questioned as to whether they had heard chemical alarms of nerve gas during their deployment.

The soldiers’ samples were tested for a gene called PON1, which breaks down chemicals in the body.

A variant, called PON1Q, generates an enzyme that breaks down sarin.

Another variant, called PON1R, helps the body break down other chemicals but is not efficient at destroying sarin.

Each carries two copies of PON1, giving them a QQ, RR, or QR genotype.

The results, published in the journal Environmental health perspectivesshows that Gulf War veterans with the QQ genotype who heard alarms of nerve agents – a proxy for chemical exposure – were 3.75 times more likely to have the syndrome than those who didn’t hear the alarm.

For those who had a QR genotype, hearing the alarms increased the chance of having Gulf War syndrome by 4.43 times.

And for those with two copies of the R gene – which is inefficient at breaking down sarin – the chance that the condition is increased 8.91 times.

The researchers said the genetic data provides a “high degree” of confidence that sarin causes the condition.

Dr Haley said, “Your risk is gradually increasing depending on your genotype, because those genes are mediating how well your body inactivates sarin.

The weather satellite image shows a large cloud of debris, which has been confirmed to contain sarin, in the photo rising from the site and spreading over US ground troops, where it has triggered thousands of nerve gas alarms.

The weather satellite image shows a large cloud of debris, which has been confirmed to contain sarin, in the photo rising from the site and spreading over US ground troops, where it has triggered thousands of nerve gas alarms.

WHAT ARE GULF WAR SYNDROME?

Gulf War Syndrome refers to the unexplained illnesses that occur in veterans of the 1991 Gulf War.

Symptoms include fatigue, fever, night sweats, memory and concentration problems, difficulty finding words, diarrhea, sexual dysfunction, and chronic body pain.

Approximately 33,000 soldiers in the UK and 250,000 in the US have complained of a range of chronic and unexplained symptoms.

There is no specific treatment for the condition.

A new US government-funded study claims to offer “more definitive” evidence that the destruction of IraqThe storage of chemical weapons is responsible.

The explosions of January 1991, centered on the cities of Muthanna and Fallujah, released sarin, a lethal nerve agent, into the air.

The man-made gas, presumably used in Syria, usually kills, but the doses inhaled by the Western militaries patrolling the country have been diluted.

Dr. Robert Haley, who has studied the syndrome for 28 years, said the quantities were still enough to make people sick, however.

“It doesn’t mean you can’t get Gulf War disease if you have the QQ genotype, because even the highest level of genetic protection can be overwhelmed by higher intensity exposure.”

The strong “gene-environment interaction is considered a gold standard for proving that a disease” is caused by a particular environmental toxic exposure, he added.

Dr. Hayley noted that the finding “does not rule out” that other chemical exposures could be responsible for some sick soldiers.

But he said the team’s extensive genetic analysis doesn’t appear to identify any other contributing chemicals.

Sarin, which can be a colorless liquid or gas, was first developed as a pesticide by Nazi Germany.

It was banned from production in 1997, but has since been used in chemical warfare, including in Syria and during a terrorist attack in Japan.

The research was funded by the US Army Medical Research and Material Command, the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs.

The US military has confirmed that sarin was found in Iraq during the six-month Gulf War.

Satellite images show that an Iraqi chemical weapons depot site was bombed by the United States and some of the 35 coalition nations that participated in the conflict.

A large cloud of debris, which was confirmed to contain sarin, was depicted rising from the site and spreading over ground troops, where it triggered thousands of nerve gas alarms.

Previous studies have found a link between Gulf War veterans who reported being exposed to sarin and the symptoms of the syndrome. But critics said this was due to a reminder of prejudices.

Dr Hayley said: ‘What makes this new study a game changer is that it links Gulf War syndrome with a very strong gene-environment interaction that cannot be explained by errors in remembering environmental exposure or others. data bias “.

After the war, researchers studied a list of possible causes of the disease, ranging from stress, vaccination and burning of oil wells to exposure to pesticides, nerve gas, anti-nerve drugs, and depleted uranium.

Some of the studies have identified links to the disease, but none of these causes have been widely accepted.

Dr Haley said, “Ever since 1995, when we first defined Gulf War disease, the evidence indicated exposure to nerve agents, but it took many years to build an irrefutable case.”