French engineers launch the Cheezam app which uses artificial intelligence to identify different cheeses from a single photo

Brilliant news for cheese lovers! French engineers launch the Cheezam app which uses artificial intelligence to identify different cheeses from a single photo

  • Cheezam was inspired by the popular Shazam music search app
  • Compare the photos to its database of 9,000 images of different cheeses
  • Try to identify key characteristics, including the size and shape of the mold
  • Cheezam is currently only available in France and it is unclear when or if it will be distributed to cheese lovers around the world

There is nothing more annoying than indulging in a delicious cheese platter in a restaurant, only to forget what varieties are in front of you.

But the days of scrambling to find the menu could be a thing of the past, thanks to a new app called Cheezam.

Cheezam was inspired by the music research app, Shazam, and uses artificial intelligence (AI) to identify different cheeses from a single photo.

Users simply snap a photo of the cheese they want to identify and a series of suggestions will appear within seconds

Cheezam was inspired by the music research app, Shazam, and uses artificial intelligence (AI) to identify different cheeses from a single photo

The £ 240,000 robot chef can make the perfect CHEESE FONDUE

Served in a boiling pot with a selection of dark ingredients, cheese fondue is undoubtedly one of the most popular dishes for cheese lovers around the world.

Now, the famous Swiss dish can be prepared, mixed and served by a robot chef.

A Swiss team worked away Boubotthe robotic creation that reinterprets an Alpine tradition in a futuristic key.

Development of the robot cost up to £ 240,000 ($ 325,000).

Users simply snap a photo of a cheese they want to identify, and a series of suggestions will appear within seconds.

The Cheezam app works by comparing photos to its database of 9,000 images of different cheeses.

Try to identify key characteristics, including the size and shape of the mold and how any spots are arranged in the cheese.

talking with liberationIsabelle Mashola, CEO of Isahit, who has annotated thousands of cheeses for the app, explained how the algorithm works.

“Let’s take a Fourme d’Ambert and a Gorgonzola,” he said.

‘In order for the algorithm to determine the photo, it is necessary to provide guidance which is provided in the form of annotations.

‘On a blue cheese, for example, we will notice that the spots are arranged like this.

‘The algorithm will then strive to recognize this feature by comparing it with other pre-annotated images.

“And that’s how we manage to fine-tune the calculation to the right cheese.”

Cheezam’s answer will always be hypothetical and allows for a margin of error, Mashola added.

In addition to the answers, the app also offers users wine pairing suggestions, ideal for an evening of cheese and wine

In addition to the answers, the app also offers users wine pairing suggestions, ideal for an evening of cheese and wine

For example, in response to a photo of a cheese with starry greenish spots, the app suggests there’s a 95% chance it’s Fourme d’Ambert and a five percent chance it’s Bleu des Causses.

In addition to the answers, the app also offers users wine pairing suggestions, ideal for a cheese and wine evening!

At this early stage, Cheezam developers are encouraging users to report any errors so they can improve the app.

Cheezam is currently only available in France and it is unclear when or if it will be distributed to cheese lovers around the world.

However, it has already been warmly received by cheese lovers on Twitter.

One user tweeted: ‘I can’t do more French tech than this. Shazam for cheese. Recommend wine to go with it.’

Another added: ‘Did you think the US, or China, were the leaders in AI? France just produced an app that can instantly recognize any cheese.’

And one joked: “We’ve probably reached the peak of evolution.”

Why cheese and wine go so well together: Fatty foods interact with chemicals in wine and mask unwanted flavors, study finds

We all know that food pairs best with wine to delightfully complement the flavors of a meal.

Now, French scientists have shown that the reverse is also true: fats in food interact with compounds in wine to enhance the flavor of the drink.

Researchers explored how lipids – fat molecules abundant in cheese, meat, vegetable oils and other foods – interact with grape tannins.

Tannins are a group of bitter and astringent compounds that occur naturally in plants, seeds, bark, wood, leaves and skins of fruits, including grapes.

Scientists claim that tannins enlarge lipids, accentuating their taste and masking their undesirable bitter taste.

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